Refugees are people who fall under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, its 1967Protocol, the Protocol, the 1969 OAU Convention, those under temporary protection and people in refugee like situations.

Data does not take into account the 5 million refugees registered with the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees.

Australia's Refugees by GDP (PPP) Per Capita is 0.80, too small to register on the above chart.

Understanding Refugees by GDP (PPP) Per Capita:

Gross National Product (GDP) measures the value of goods and services produced in a country in a given year, otherwise known as the national wealth. GDP Per capita is the ratio between national wealth and the country’s population, it is believed that the higher the GDP Per Capita the greater the standard of living. Purchasing Power Party (PPP) converts the GDP of a country into an international dollar and used for comparisons between countries.

For these charts, we can see the ratio between hosting 1 refugee and $1 of national wealth. Where the ratio is high there is an expected higher relative contribution and effort to host refugees.

GDP Purchasing Power Parity Per Capita 2013 Sourced from International Monetary Fund World Economic Outlook April 2014.
Countries whose data was missing from the IMF data was taken from the World Bank and the CIA World Factbook

Understanding Refugees per 1000 Inhabitants

This figure shows how many refugees there for every 1000 people already living in that country.

Asylum seekers are people who have a pending case for asylum or protection as at the end of the 31 of December 2013. All people who have a case pending at this date are counted as asylum seekers even if they first made their application in an earlier year.

Understanding Asylum Seekers by GDP (PPP) Per Capita:

Gross National Product (GDP) measures the value of goods and services produced in a country in a given year, otherwise known as the national wealth. GDP Per capita is the ratio between national wealth and the country’s population, it is believed that the higher the GDP Per Capita the greater the standard of living. Purchasing Power Party (PPP) converts the GDP of a country into an international dollar and used for comparisons between countries.

For these charts, we can see the ratio between hosting 1 asylum seeker and $1 of national wealth. Where the ratio is high there is an expected higher relative contribution and effort to host asylum seekers.

GDP Purchasing Power Parity Per Capita 2013 Sourced from International Monetary Fund World Economic Outlook April 2014.
Countries whose data was missing from the IMF data was taken from the World Bank and the CIA World Factbook

Understanding Asylum Seekers per 1000 Inhabitants

This figure shows how many asylum seekers there for every 1000 people already living in that country.

The people of concern are made up of; refugees, asylum seekers, internally displaced people, stateless people, returned refugees, returned internally displaced people and a group of people who fall outside of these categories but are considered in need on humanitarian grounds.

Note: Out of these groups Australia hosts refugees and asylum seekers.

Understanding Asylum Seekers by GDP (PPP) Per Capita:

Gross National Product (GDP) measures the value of goods and services produced in a country in a given year, otherwise known as the national wealth. GDP Per capita is the ratio between national wealth and the country’s population, it is believed that the higher the GDP Per Capita the greater the standard of living. Purchasing Power Party (PPP) converts the GDP of a country into an international dollar and used for comparisons between countries.

For these charts, we can see the ratio between hosting 1 person of concern and $1 of national wealth. Where the ratio is high there is an expected higher relative contribution and effort to host a person of concern.

GDP Purchasing Power Parity Per Capita 2013 Sourced from International Monetary Fund World Economic Outlook April 2014.
Countries whose data was missing from the IMF data was taken from the World Bank and the CIA World Factbook

Understanding Total People of Concern per 1000 Inhabitants

This figure shows how many total people of concern there for every 1000 people already living in that country.

Statistics for refugee, asylum seeker and total people of concern populations are from the  2013 UNHCR Global Trends. In most cases data up until 31 December 2013. For more information email educate@asrc.org.au